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30 Day Movie Challenge Day 11: Your Favorite Childhood Movie

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  • 30 Day Movie Challenge Day 11: Your Favorite Childhood Movie

    Widgets Magazine
    Like a lot of kids, it’s easy to grow up on Disney movies – especially back in the 70′s when I was but a wee lad and there was little in the way of selection. One movie that I was apparently endlessly fascinated by was*The Jungle Book, which my mother claims is my favorite childhood […]

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  • #2
    Re: 30 Day Movie Challenge Day 11: Your Favorite Childhood Movie

    This is maybe the toughest question so far.

    In the era before VCRs and cable tv were widespread, watching a film was luck of the draw. You watched whatever film was in the theaters or on broadcast tv. And while I enjoyed going to see Star Wars and Superman in the theaters, seeing the films only once made them ephemeral experiences.

    The films that meant the most to me were the ones that were broadcast annually in network television. (This is the part of this post where I tie an onion to my belt.) We really are spoiled today in our ability to watch thousands of films within seconds of the whim hitting us. 40 years ago, that would have seemed like science fiction. Back then, if you wanted to watch The Ten Commandments, you could either spend many hundreds of dollars on video equipment, or do what everyone else did and watch it on tv at Easter time. The annual favorites were hugely popular tv events.

    I liked The Ten Commandments, but my favorites were Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (which scared me) and everybody's favorite, The Wizard of Oz. Pre-VCR, everybody watched the annual airing of this film: it registered some of the highest tv ratings in history. Of course it's a classic film with a brilliant cast and some of the best songs in the history of film. But for people of a certain age (40 or so and older) it is remembered as a beloved annual event.

    (But I'm not going to be fooled by nostalgia. Instant film gratification is WAY better.)
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    • #3
      Re: 30 Day Movie Challenge Day 11: Your Favorite Childhood Movie

      Ah, I love Disney's Robin Hood. Damn those critics for (not incorrectly) dismissing it as little more than a cheap way to re-use animation work already paid for on The Jungle Book. I was not really a Disney kid, immersed in all of their movies (first I saw in theaters was Beauty and the Beast), but Robin Hood and maybe Alice in Wonderland (honestly still one of the better adaptations of the material) stand out from my childhood.

      But, come on. This one's the easiest: The Goonies. It wasn't the first, but it's the first movie I clearly remember going to see in a theater, when I was six, down to the walk back and forth from the theater with my brother (12 at the time) and his friend. I don't know why he was suckered into bringing me along, but I appreciate it. (Six years later, when I was 12, I watched Clockwork Orange for the first time with him...and he got me into a showing of Pulp Fiction three years later...so read into that influence as you will.) I know I wasn't scared by anything in the movie, which is interesting hearing some other reactions by kids seeing it for the first time, but it certainly implanted in my brain the same way a first love would. Goonies forever, man.

      Originally posted by Sigma UFO View Post
      Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (which scared me) and everybody's favorite, The Wizard of Oz. Pre-VCR, everybody watched the annual airing of this film: it registered some of the highest tv ratings in history. Of course it's a classic film with a brilliant cast and some of the best songs in the history of film. But for people of a certain age (40 or so and older) it is remembered as a beloved annual event.
      Especially Oz, but come to think of it now, Willy Wonka, were indeed annual events in my 80s childhood. (So let's say mid-30s or older. )
      Avatar: Tsumugi, Sweetness & Lightning
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