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I love how the Internet has encouraged faster publishing and less proofing

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  • I love how the Internet has encouraged faster publishing and less proofing

    Widgets Magazine
    The subject line kind of says it all, but it's also kind of vague.

    So, just so no one gets the wrong idea, what I'm thinking about mainly is news organizations and their affiliates, and publishing articles online.

    Y'know, back in the days of the newspaper, things were checked before the paper went to print, so as to avoid mishaps of varying degrees. Now, that didn't prevent problems, and retractions, etc., had to be printed in later issues, but there was still diligence.

    Then TV news came around, and live TV reporting has obviously led to all sorts of silly happenings. Many of those are now preserved on the Internet for our viewing amusement.

    And then news started being posted online. And increasingly, in a race to be first, or perhaps simply to cut costs, there is even less checking of stories and articles when they first go up. Now, the Internet means that once something wrong is spotted, it can be changed immediately. However, if you're one of the normal readers that notices something first, you can come across some interesting things.

    I seem to encounter a lot of curse words included uncensored in quotes, more than anything else. It's kind of baffling, since a quote like that had to have been selected and specifically typed out, so why would it not occur to someone (directly) working for, say, the New York Times to censor a couple of f-bombs and the n-word out of a quote from a guy in an article of theirs about people being arrested for a racially-motivated hate crime? (This happened, it was hilarious, and I'm sorry I didn't screencap it before it was changed.) It's just weird.

    Anyway, what really motivated this post was an article on one of CNN's affiliate sites, CNNGo, from April of last year that I somehow stumbled across after clicking through too many sidebars. The topic of the article was "Asia's most sinful cities," an amusing tongue-in-cheek list of Asian cities, each assigned to one of the Seven Deadly Sins. Tokyo was assigned to Lust. The article makes use of a photo of a manga store that I find fascinating, and definitely NSFW, though admittedly you have to more than glance at it to see why. Which is probably all the writer or editor or whomever approved the article did. Because I see boobies, nipples and underage nudity. Not illegal, of course, but certainly enough to give certain people immediate aneurysms. (Anyone want to take a crack at identifying which books those posters are for? Because I see things that are relevant to my interests.)

    Maybe it's because CNNGo is actually an independent site carrying CNN branding based in eastern Asia and intended for English-speaking folks in that region, that they figured there was no problem. Sexually-charged manga tends to be a bit less of an issue there than here. Still, it's associated with CNN, and you'd expect that someone would perhaps take issue with an article that includes a picture with bare underage boobies. Maybe not. If that's the case, I demand that regular CNN include more boobies in their own articles, post haste!
    asa --> S^2 --> Hayate
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  • #2
    Re: I love how the Internet has encouraged faster publishing and less proofing

    Oh man, I feel I have to share this. My local news channel gained worldwide attention for a...mistake. See for yourself.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5CDhYm1FR3M

    She said it twice too. I work at a restaurant with one of the reporters that works at Global as well. She told me it's getting worldwide attention, haha. My city FTW.

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    • #3
      Re: I love how the Internet has encouraged faster publishing and less proofing

      Originally posted by Hayate Kurogane View Post
      (Anyone want to take a crack at identifying which books those posters are for? Because I see things that are relevant to my interests.)
       
      The posters, from left to right: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.

      1 is Kiss Me by Shinama.
      2 is Take On Me 2 by Takemura Sesshū.
      3 is Misao My Love by Orimoto Minama.
      4 is Uekano Days by Chiba Toshirō.
      5 is Blood Lunch by Type. 90.
       
      Last edited by kijakusai; 02-18-2012, 05:22 AM.

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      • #4
        Re: I love how the Internet has encouraged faster publishing and less proofing

        Originally posted by Cutliquidsnake View Post
        Oh man, I feel I have to share this. My local news channel gained worldwide attention for a...mistake. See for yourself.

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5CDhYm1FR3M

        She said it twice too. I work at a restaurant with one of the reporters that works at Global as well. She told me it's getting worldwide attention, haha. My city FTW.
        Live television definitely has its ups and downs.
        "Ninjas, sushi, schoolgirls, samurai, and boobs. These are the things that cross all borders, and tie us together!"

        Current backlog purgatory: 39 Boxes Proof that anime costs more than drugs | Conquering the world one game at a time

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        • #5
          Re: I love how the Internet has encouraged faster publishing and less proofing

          Originally posted by kijakusai View Post
          Originally posted by Hayate Kurogane View Post
          (Anyone want to take a crack at identifying which books those posters are for? Because I see things that are relevant to my interests.)
           
          2 is Take On Me 2 by Takemura Sesshū.
          Wait, what?

          *goes and looks at the Internet*

          Okay, I should hand in my fan card, since I failed utterly at noticing there was a second volume to one of my favorite ero-manga books ever. Dammit!

          Time to go place an import order!
          asa --> S^2 --> Hayate
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          • #6
            Re: I love how the Internet has encouraged faster publishing and less proofing

            I read a lot of news on my phone, and the standards and checks for mobile versions of news sites tend to allow for even more slip-ups than their regular online versions. It's where I notice most of the news article gaffes I come across.

            ESPN stepped in it badly last night with an article on the mobile version of their site about Jeremy Lin and the Knicks' loss in their recent game. Lin is of Taiwanese and Chinese descent, for those who aren't NBA fans or sports fans or who are already tired of the Lin fever that's sweeping everything for some reason and so avoid paying attention. ESPN's mobile site and its staff decided that an intelligent headline to go with would be "Chink in the Armor."

            Yep.

            It lasted about half an hour before being taken down. Can't imagine why.

            Story and screencap via Deadspin.
            asa --> S^2 --> Hayate
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            • #7
              Re: I love how the Internet has encouraged faster publishing and less proofing

              Originally posted by Hayate Kurogane View Post
              . . . Lin is of Taiwanese and Chinese descent, for those who aren't NBA fans or sports fans or who are already tired of the Lin fever that's sweeping everything for some reason and so avoid paying attention. ESPN's mobile site and its staff decided that an intelligent headline to go with would be "Chink in the Armor.". . .
              In ESPN's defense, I've never actually heard or seen "chink" used as an ethnic slur, except in history books. The writers and proofreaders may not have even realized that it is/was an insult, and the phrase "chink in the armor" is so readily used for a flaw in one's defenses, they probably didn't even think twice about it
              "The roaring of lions, the howling of wolves, the raging of the stormy sea, and the destructive sword, are portions of eternity too great for the eye of man."

              -William Blake, "The Marriage of Heaven and Hell"

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              • #8
                Re: I love how the Internet has encouraged faster publishing and less proofing

                Three favorite screenshots I've saved from baseball-related stories...

                First a "rim" shot should be appropriate here.
                colonk.jpg

                Yeah, here's a line of products that will get Susan G. Komen back in the good graces of the American woman...
                ticklepink.jpg

                Sorry, I have no joke to go with this one. HOW DID THIS GET PAST PROOFREADERS?
                yankeeswang.jpg
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                • #9
                  Re: I love how the Internet has encouraged faster publishing and less proofing

                  Originally posted by Hayate Kurogane View Post
                  . . . ESPN stepped in it badly last night with an article on the mobile version of their site about Jeremy Lin and the Knicks' loss in their recent game. Lin is of Taiwanese and Chinese descent, . . . ESPN's mobile site and its staff decided that an intelligent headline to go with would be "Chink in the Armor."
                  According to CNN, one of the anchors also used that phrase on the air. However, I still believe its an innocent mistake - "chink" is one of those ethnic slurs that appear to be dying, if not already dead and forgotten (at least in my region). And "chink in the armor" is such a common aphorism . . . I really find it unlikely that either the ESPN anchor or website even thought about a possible double meaning to the phrase.
                  "The roaring of lions, the howling of wolves, the raging of the stormy sea, and the destructive sword, are portions of eternity too great for the eye of man."

                  -William Blake, "The Marriage of Heaven and Hell"

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                  • #10
                    Re: I love how the Internet has encouraged faster publishing and less proofing

                    Originally posted by One Vorlon View Post
                    Originally posted by Hayate Kurogane View Post
                    . . . Lin is of Taiwanese and Chinese descent, for those who aren't NBA fans or sports fans or who are already tired of the Lin fever that's sweeping everything for some reason and so avoid paying attention. ESPN's mobile site and its staff decided that an intelligent headline to go with would be "Chink in the Armor.". . .
                    In ESPN's defense, I've never actually heard or seen "chink" used as an ethnic slur, except in history books. The writers and proofreaders may not have even realized that it is/was an insult, and the phrase "chink in the armor" is so readily used for a flaw in one's defenses, they probably didn't even think twice about it
                    I have. It's not as highly used as some of the slurs, but I think that has more to do with the fact there are so few Chinese Americans that we're not prone to using it. It is amazing to me that the writer or at least an editor wouldn't have realized, "Wow, this could be an offensive term!" It's a shame when something that's obviously a common phrase is misconstrued as a slur, but that's the sort of age of political correctness we live in.
                    "Ninjas, sushi, schoolgirls, samurai, and boobs. These are the things that cross all borders, and tie us together!"

                    Current backlog purgatory: 39 Boxes Proof that anime costs more than drugs | Conquering the world one game at a time

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                    • #11
                      Re: I love how the Internet has encouraged faster publishing and less proofing

                      Originally posted by One Vorlon View Post
                      Originally posted by Hayate Kurogane View Post
                      . . . ESPN stepped in it badly last night with an article on the mobile version of their site about Jeremy Lin and the Knicks' loss in their recent game. Lin is of Taiwanese and Chinese descent, . . . ESPN's mobile site and its staff decided that an intelligent headline to go with would be "Chink in the Armor."
                      According to CNN, one of the anchors also used that phrase on the air. However, I still believe its an innocent mistake - "chink" is one of those ethnic slurs that appear to be dying, if not already dead and forgotten (at least in my region). And "chink in the armor" is such a common aphorism . . . I really find it unlikely that either the ESPN anchor or website even thought about a possible double meaning to the phrase.
                      Maybe it's partly because of where I've lived most of my life (85% caucasian population) but I've heard chink used as a racial slur all my life, to this day. From my POV it's not dead or dying and ESPN does nooooooooooooooooot get any kind of pass from me for that bullshit. I'll call a spade a spade; on air or in print that is straight-up racist.
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                      • #12
                        Re: I love how the Internet has encouraged faster publishing and less proofing

                        Originally posted by Legion View Post
                        Maybe it's partly because of where I've lived most of my life (85% caucasian population) but I've heard chink used as a racial slur all my life, to this day. From my POV it's not dead or dying and ESPN does nooooooooooooooooot get any kind of pass from me for that bullshit. I'll call a spade a spade; on air or in print that is straight-up racist.
                        Ditto. Up here, you hear it quite often, especially from people who (for one reason or another) are distressed by the quantity of manufactured goods we import from China. (Or who delight in taking potshots at Japan's "degenerate" culture.)
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                        • #13
                          Re: I love how the Internet has encouraged faster publishing and less proofing

                          Originally posted by Sigma UFO View Post
                          Three favorite screenshots I've saved from baseball-related stories...

                          First a "rim" shot should be appropriate here.
                          [ATTACH=CONFIG]101[/ATTACH]

                          Yeah, here's a line of products that will get Susan G. Komen back in the good graces of the American woman...
                          [ATTACH=CONFIG]102[/ATTACH]

                          Sorry, I have no joke to go with this one. HOW DID THIS GET PAST PROOFREADERS?
                          [ATTACH=CONFIG]103[/ATTACH]
                          sometimes I think those types of 'misprints' are intentional. The second and third one are so blatant with their appropriate photos.

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                          • #14
                            Re: I love how the Internet has encouraged faster publishing and less proofing

                            Originally posted by Hayate Kurogane View Post
                            Maybe not. If that's the case, I demand that regular CNN include more boobies in their own articles, post haste!
                            It would make the news a whole lot more interesting .

                            Anyway I find that story you linked to very funny. In a way it seems the very point of the picture is to show how sexual things are, and "anything goes". So on one hand I kind of think it was intentional to use that picture. But you'd think they'd at least censor the boobies. I mean you'd get the point across, and not have any nudity in it. *shrug*

                            your post reminds me of this old thing btw =P .
                            Last edited by Prede; 02-22-2012, 11:19 AM.
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                            • #15
                              Re: I love how the Internet has encouraged faster publishing and less proofing

                              Originally posted by Prede View Post
                              Originally posted by Hayate Kurogane View Post
                              Maybe not. If that's the case, I demand that regular CNN include more boobies in their own articles, post haste!
                              It would make the news a whole lot more interesting . . .
                              Its been done before - ever hear of the Naked News (NSFW)? Its a serious news show, but the anchors strip down as they go through the daily news.
                              "The roaring of lions, the howling of wolves, the raging of the stormy sea, and the destructive sword, are portions of eternity too great for the eye of man."

                              -William Blake, "The Marriage of Heaven and Hell"

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