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Being a high school dropout.

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  • #31
    Re: Being a high school dropout.

    It's not about being a millionaire. It's about taking strategies that are most likely to improve your lot given the hand you are dealt. You may ignore chance, but it's a large determinant of where anyone ends up in life. But at this point, it's clear you're not interested in the data. If you want to give advice based on some bull shit Carpe diem philosophy, I can only hope your making a profit off of it.

    And FYI, elementary education[1] doesn't require a Master and Nursing most certainly requires at least LPN (and note, for nursing, the more education the more opportunities you have and thus you earn more). For that matter, a lot of the vocational jobs you mention require formalized technical training and/ore licensure, unless you want to remain at the bottom (which often is not well-compensated).

    [1]Education is also a poor choice in a field, unless you love doing it and are willing to trade income for it.
    Clannad is Life, Da Capo is Pure Love, Higurashi is Ethics, & Tori no Uta is the National Anthem.

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    • #32
      Re: Being a high school dropout.

      Originally posted by Gatts View Post
      Teachers make around 30k per year and the require a master's degree.
      Depends what you're talking. College instructors need a master's (though you need a doctorate for just about any institution unless you only want to be a part-time instructor, which pays a decent enough stipend for moonlighters but little else), but you don't have to have that high for anything K-12. They do, in either case, make next to nothing, and as mentioned an education degree will pretty much get you nowhere in terms of pay unless you win the lottery and get a principal position or something along those lines.

      It's possible to make more money without a degree but as Draneor mentioned, the odds are in the favor of someone with a degree, particularly at the college level, but even a diploma makes a big difference. Heck, you can be in a job that doesn't even use your degree and still make a lot of money because of it (speaking from personal experience here).
      Last edited by Ryos; 03-05-2012, 04:39 PM.
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      • #33
        Re: Being a high school dropout.

        Originally posted by Draneor View Post
        It's not about being a millionaire. It's about taking strategies that are most likely to improve your lot given the hand you are dealt. You may ignore chance, but it's a large determinant of where anyone ends up in life. But at this point, it's clear you're not interested in the data. If you want to give advice based on some bull shit Carpe diem philosophy, I can only hope your making a profit off of it.
        You're being quite the hostile for no reason, but whatever.

        I'm speaking from real life experience not from "bull shit Carpe diem philosophy". Not from "data". Your lot in life doesn't improve from college. Your lot in life improves from getting off your ass and doing something. Waiting for life to come to you and hand you a million dollars is foolish. Too many people go to college, get a degree and then sit on it because they are too good to do a different job.

        The cashier at my Auto Zone has a bachelors in mechanical engineering. Why is he there? Well after he graduated, he went to take his Fundamentals exam (FE) and failed. Anyone who has taken engineering will tell you that this isn't an exam many people pass on their first try, but he was the guy who never failed at anything, so he got dejected and decided "well, I'll take about a year off and take the exam again later" instead of taking it again immediately. His father was a district manager at Auto Zone, so he decided to work there while he waited. Well what do you know, it's 10 years later and he's still working at AutoZone while sitting on his engineering degree. Every time I see him I ask him why he never took the fundamentals exam again. The conversation goes like this most of the time:
        "Hey man, when are you going to get a real job, you should be making more money than me"
        "Well, I've forgotten a lot of stuff and I really need to take a refresher course"
        "So why aren't you?"
        "You know man, I just finished off paying for college and I'd feel out of it being that old guy in school. I use to make fun of those guys"
        "So you're going to work at Auto Zone for the rest of your life because you are afraid of some kids making fun of you behind your back?"

        and so on. Also the worst part of him working at Auto Zone is because his father is currently a regional manager (formally district manager), he can't be promoted to manager in any store within his father's region because of nepotism rules.

        I can spend all day talking about people with degrees that I went to college with who have done NOTHING with their lives and I'm not even old. Hell man, you live in DC. If you are anywhere near Laurel I can take you around and personally introduce you to people with degrees who are currently working in places that have nothing to do with their major. I can also introduce you to just as many people who did not graduate who are doing just fine with their lives. Let's head up to Glen Burnie and I'll walk you through some of the businesses some time.

        You really need to take some time out. Walk around your local businesses speak to the people in there. Find out what they did and what they plan to do. You'd might be surprised that there are tons of extremely intelligent people out there who did not go to college.

        Also as for nursing requiring a college degree, that's not the case. Medix School handles nursing training and does not require a college degree. The nursing field is in need of help right now. Go to the American Nurses Association website, look around. They are willing to train you as long as you are willing to put the work in.

        I'm also not understanding the teacher hate. It's a good job, it just doesn't pay very well.
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        • #34
          Re: Being a high school dropout.

          Originally posted by Gatts View Post
          You're being quite the hostile for no reason, but whatever.

          I'm speaking from real life experience not from "bull shit Carpe diem philosophy". Not from "data". Your lot in life doesn't improve from college. Your lot in life improves from getting off your ass and doing something. Waiting for life to come to you and hand you a million dollars is foolish. Too many people go to college, get a degree and then sit on it because they are too good to do a different job.

          The cashier at my Auto Zone has a bachelors in mechanical engineering. Why is he there? Well after he graduated, he went to take his Fundamentals exam (FE) and failed. Anyone who has taken engineering will tell you that this isn't an exam many people pass on their first try, but he was the guy who never failed at anything, so he got dejected and decided "well, I'll take about a year off and take the exam again later" instead of taking it again immediately. His father was a district manager at Auto Zone, so he decided to work there while he waited. Well what do you know, it's 10 years later and he's still working at AutoZone while sitting on his engineering degree. Every time I see him I ask him why he never took the fundamentals exam again. The conversation goes like this most of the time:
          "Hey man, when are you going to get a real job, you should be making more money than me"
          "Well, I've forgotten a lot of stuff and I really need to take a refresher course"
          "So why aren't you?"
          "You know man, I just finished off paying for college and I'd feel out of it being that old guy in school. I use to make fun of those guys"
          "So you're going to work at Auto Zone for the rest of your life because you are afraid of some kids making fun of you behind your back?"

          and so on. Also the worst part of him working at Auto Zone is because his father is currently a regional manager (formally district manager), he can't be promoted to manager in any store within his father's region because of nepotism rules.

          I can spend all day talking about people with degrees that I went to college with who have done NOTHING with their lives and I'm not even old. Hell man, you live in DC. If you are anywhere near Laurel I can take you around and personally introduce you to people with degrees who are currently working in places that have nothing to do with their major. I can also introduce you to just as many people who did not graduate who are doing just fine with their lives. Let's head up to Glen Burnie and I'll walk you through some of the businesses some time.

          You really need to take some time out. Walk around your local businesses speak to the people in there. Find out what they did and what they plan to do. You'd might be surprised that there are tons of extremely intelligent people out there who did not go to college.

          Also as for nursing requiring a college degree, that's not the case. Medix School handles nursing training and does not require a college degree. The nursing field is in need of help right now. Go to the American Nurses Association website, look around. They are willing to train you as long as you are willing to put the work in.

          I'm also not understanding the teacher hate. It's a good job, it just doesn't pay very well.
          Hmm, I've been reading this for a while and seen some good points made and other very circular arguments. Gatts, are you saying that people who get a degree and fail to do anything with it are failures by some criteria, such as your friend at AutoZone? I would say this is more a character issue than anything inherently wrong with getting the degree, and had this person followed through with the FE they probably would have been making more money, and I'm assuming you would agree with this in some part.

          In summation, I find that you stress good personal character as integral to a person's success, and I agree 100%. But I find your disregarding of the value of a college degree based on that very same logic perturbing. I think you, like many, simplify the argument of college and success to some naive points. College is, and has always been, a tool. Depending on what you do at that level of academia determines whether or not you further yourself. A person who really wants to study biology is going to get nowhere by reading a few books at the local library, that takes labwork in an academic setting.

          No one is saying that only intelligent people go to college, or all college graduates are more intelligent than non-grads, and I find that assumption very insulting. Success is a subjective term, but I don't know that a person who exploited every opportunity in college for their personal benefit came out worse than when they went in. College, when used to a person's advantage, opens up a ton of doors in today's modern society. This is the simple fact, cut and dry.

          A very savvy person can become very rich, find quite a bit of success. But the right college will do nothing to stifle that person, and if used properly give them even MORE tools to find success. "Getting up off your ass and doing something" represents good character traits, but the most determined person in the world won't get very far in the world by punching at a brick wall in his path with his bare hands. That person could expend less energy by walking around that brick wall. I hope that analogy makes sense.

          I think that reconciles the small disagreement both sides were having. Also, for everyone, can we please ween off the tired cliches a bit? Along with very small, self-selecting biased supports, they really don't do much to further an argument.

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          • #35
            Re: Being a high school dropout.

            Originally posted by Tenkyoken View Post
            Hmm, I've been reading this for a while and seen some good points made and other very circular arguments. Gatts, are you saying that people who get a degree and fail to do anything with it are failures by some criteria, such as your friend at AutoZone? I would say this is more a character issue than anything inherently wrong with getting the degree, and had this person followed through with the FE they probably would have been making more money, and I'm assuming you would agree with this in some part.

            In summation, I find that you stress good personal character as integral to a person's success, and I agree 100%. But I find your disregarding of the value of a college degree based on that very same logic perturbing. I think you, like many, simplify the argument of college and success to some naive points. College is, and has always been, a tool. Depending on what you do at that level of academia determines whether or not you further yourself. A person who really wants to study biology is going to get nowhere by reading a few books at the local library, that takes labwork in an academic setting.

            No one is saying that only intelligent people go to college, or all college graduates are more intelligent than non-grads, and I find that assumption very insulting. Success is a subjective term, but I don't know that a person who exploited every opportunity in college for their personal benefit came out worse than when they went in. College, when used to a person's advantage, opens up a ton of doors in today's modern society. This is the simple fact, cut and dry.

            A very savvy person can become very rich, find quite a bit of success. But the right college will do nothing to stifle that person, and if used properly give them even MORE tools to find success. "Getting up off your ass and doing something" represents good character traits, but the most determined person in the world won't get very far in the world by punching at a brick wall in his path with his bare hands. That person could expend less energy by walking around that brick wall. I hope that analogy makes sense.

            I think that reconciles the small disagreement both sides were having. Also, for everyone, can we please ween off the tired cliches a bit? Along with very small, self-selecting biased supports, they really don't do much to further an argument.
            Hmm, now I'm not arguing against going to college either. I went to college. College is good if you know what you are doing. What I'm saying, again from personal experience, is that college is not the only way to get by in life. You can be successful with or without college. If you put in the work then college is "yet another option" that you can choose to go into. Having people tell you that you have to go to college in order to succeed is a fallacy. I dislike the fact that people look down on perfectly reasonable jobs just because they aren't college careers. My family is made up of non-graduates.

            My father was enlisted in Vietnam and came back to work as an electrician. No college.
            My uncle was also enlisted in Vietnam and works as a sanitation worker. No college.
            My cousin did not go to college, works as a repo man. Makes twice as much as I do.
            Another cousin is a Mechanic
            My aunt works in elderly care.

            I find it insulting to say "oh if you don't spend 100k to get a 4 year degree you can't do anything with your life". Saying things like that means you are looking down on a lot of people who did make it without spending that amount of time and saying that there is only one way to succeed in life is what gets so many people into trouble in the long run. For me, the most important thing will always be finding what you want to do and making sure you do it. You can find that in college, but you can also find that by going out and working as an intern at different jobs.

            Heck after you intern at enough places and finally find what you would really like to do, there's nothing stopping you from going to college at that point and becoming specialized in that career path.
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            • #36
              Re: Being a high school dropout.

              Originally posted by Gatts View Post
              Your lot in life doesn't improve from college. Your lot in life improves from getting off your ass and doing something.
              Going to college is getting off your ass and doing something. Four year, two year, community college, vocational, etc., etc., seeking education is getting off your ass and doing something.

              Originally posted by Gatts View Post
              Waiting for life to come to you and hand you a million dollars is foolish. Too many people go to college, get a degree and then sit on it because they are too good to do a different job.

              The cashier at my Auto Zone has a bachelors in mechanical engineering. (snip)
              What happened to your Auto Zone friend sounds ridiculously easy to avoid. If that's the first and/or best example that comes to your mind, it makes your arguement seem really weak. Yes, you'll need to work to find work after college. I agree it won't just come to you. But any good school will have resources and people you can use to help you find work after you graduate.
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              • #37
                Re: Being a high school dropout.

                Originally posted by Legion View Post
                Originally posted by Gatts View Post
                Your lot in life doesn't improve from college. Your lot in life improves from getting off your ass and doing something.
                Going to college is getting off your ass and doing something. Four year, two year, community college, vocational, etc., etc., seeking education is getting off your ass and doing something.
                Maybe you haven't read the entire thread, but I've constantly been pushing vocational schools. Since my very first post. In fact to quote myself:
                Originally posted by Gatts View Post
                I'm not going to say you have to finish high school, but I will say that you should start thinking on what trade you want to go into. There are a number of decent to well paying jobs that do not require a diploma or GED, but apprenticeship work in trade fields is very competitive right now because of the economy. Having an idea of what you want to do can help you focus on one specific field.

                I have a friend who never graduated who owns a hauling and dumping business. He makes around 300k a year and is happily married, but he worked his butt off to get to where he is now. Do you want to put in the time and effort for something like that? Starting your own business from scratch, especially one that is mostly manual labor?
                also my second post
                Originally posted by Gatts View Post
                I disagree with this. Call center is a high stress job. I certainly wouldn't suggest going into a high stress position if you dropped out of high school due to the stress. I would say something like Data Entry would be a better suggestion. The main reason to get a GED would be if your main goal is to work in a corporate environment. If you don't want to work for someone else, then the GED isn't needed.

                The problem is at 21 if you don't really know what direction you want to go in for your life, it's better to just take that last class and keep your options open. If you do have a solid idea of what you want to do, just specialize in that one area. If that area you want to specialize in involves anything corporate, then you'll need to take that last class anyway.

                Trade work won't require a GED or diploma. Glass blower, construction, woodwork, bricklaying, tailor, chef, lumberjack, locksmith, shoemaker, etc those are all jobs that you can go into without a GED. As long as you are willing to work through the apprenticeship and you prove to be competent, you'll be able to get and keep your job.

                Don't get me wrong, even with trade work, if you want to work for a large company, they'll want you to have a diploma or GED. For example if you want to work for Clark Construction or Ryland Homes, they'll say "go back to school kid", but if you don't mind working for a smaller company or going into business for yourself, then learning a trade and striking out on your own is an option.

                Like I mentioned, it all depends on how hard you want to work to succeed.
                I know your reading and comprehensive skills aren't that weak. I've seen too many of your posts. Perhaps you just decided to ignore every single instance of my saying trade schools are just as important and viable as four year college to push a point across?
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                • #38
                  Re: Being a high school dropout.

                  As far as college goes, it does a few things for you.

                  1. expands your knowledge base.
                  2. gives you credentials that help getting a job easier.
                  3. allow you to make friends and lovers.
                  4. gets you out of the cycle of non-progression.

                  And that is about it. If you can read and write and think critically about what you read and write, it is no longer imperative. That said I am 35 and finishing up my AA. So personally I have found it a useful tool for me, but as noted previously in this thread, you can succeed with a bit of ingenuity and internal drive (although noting your history of depression, that may be a sticking point.)

                  There are only a few steps to succeeding at anything.

                  1. pick something that you want to do.
                  2. expand your knowledge base on the subject.
                  3. hone your skills
                  4. find an outlet (market) for those skills.

                  That process works whether becoming a better gardner, sculptor, day trader, tour guide, cook, better at sex, or really anything. If you get to middle age and realize you never picked a path for your life, that is ok too, go ahead and pick something. Or evaluate your comfort level, and if you have achieved decent things without following those steps, then looking to be happy with what you have achieved is better than throwing that away.

                  There are a few major barriers to all of this as well.

                  1. time - I often wished that I lived in a century in which things were not so strictly regulated as they are now, when everything was done until you felt it was finished, and then you moved on. Deadlines keep people moving, but they stand in the way of dreams by not allowing full development of your research or implementation.
                  2. money - the other thing people need to keep moving forward. It is less necessary than some people think, but it sure makes things easier.
                  3. employers - in this day and age most employers look at all of their people as fully replacable rather than crucial members of a team. If you read the codes of ethics most businesses make you sign these days, you realize that they can terminate you at any time for any reason, due to cryptic wording and a lack of loyalty.

                  That last one is actually perhaps the hardest, because you can get to a point at which you can control yourself, but you can never control other people. All the do is react to their perception of you, which is often far from the impression you think you are giving. No matter how clean you are, or how well you dress, some will approve and some will disapprove. If you are too ambitious, people may start despising you and look for you to fail. If you are too meek people will overwork you. If you take a hard line on following rules, you will trample on people; and if you have trouble following direction you will be considered out of control.. Miscommunication causes problems constantly, and any little aspect of your personality can get you canned at any time.

                  But you can't worry about that too much. Try to be helpful, and to not judge people for being at different places in their life than you are.

                  I am sorry if I rambled and got a little off point, I am merely trying to let the OP that life is basically up to him to choose how to spend it.

                  For instance I saw that you mentioned working in a pizzeria... not bad. What brought you to pizza? You can turn where you are in your favor. You can learn how carbon dioxide burned by the yeast in the oven makes a crust flaky, how whole milk mozzerella melts differently from 2% mozzerella. You can learn how to flip and toss pizza dough over your head (perfecting this can make you good money in the right places). If you are more interested in the business side you could look at opening up your own pizza shop or a franchise of your current employer. All the potential is up to you to develop. Good luck.

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                  • #39
                    Re: Being a high school dropout.

                    Originally posted by Ryos View Post
                    College instructors need a master's (though you need a doctorate for just about any institution unless you only want to be a part-time instructor, which pays a decent enough stipend for moonlighters but little else)
                    That depends on your definition of "decent enough". Standard rate for adjunct faculty at a lot of colleges I've seen is $3600 per 4-credit class, per semester. When you factor in the amount of time it takes to draw up lesson plans, prepare lecture material, grade papers/exams, and hold office hours to meet with students, that works out to about $8 per hour. You get no benefits whatsoever, and zero job security. You're hired strictly on a per year (or sometimes per semester) basis.

                    A PhD is really a prerequisite to make any sort of stable living as a college professor. Most career adjuncts rely on a spouse or significant other to be the primary wage-earner in the household. (Which isn't to say that PhD-holders can't end up as career adjuncts; there really aren't enough tenure-track positions out there to accommodate the number of doctorates issued each year. Getting stuck in "adjunct hell" is a perpetual nightmare for many grad students, and it happens often enough to be a legitimate source of anxiety.)
                    Last edited by Citizen Klaus; 03-06-2012, 12:37 PM.
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                    • #40
                      Re: Being a high school dropout.

                      Originally posted by Gatts View Post
                      I know your reading and comprehensive skills aren't that weak. I've seen too many of your posts. Perhaps you just decided to ignore every single instance of my saying trade schools are just as important and viable as four year college to push a point across?
                      In reading this entire thread I don't get the sense that you think they're equally important. I think they are all equally viable ways of getting off your ass and doing something. I don't agree that a four year college is a waste of time if you don't already know what you want to do. Part of the point of 4 year colleges is to help you figure that out and a good school will have people and resources that can help you find work after. I don't think I've ignored parts of your posts to try and make this point.
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                      • #41
                        Re: Being a high school dropout.

                        Originally posted by Legion View Post
                        In reading this entire thread I don't get the sense that you think they're equally important. I think they are all equally viable ways of getting off your ass and doing something. I don't agree that a four year college is a waste of time if you don't already know what you want to do. Part of the point of 4 year colleges is to help you figure that out and a good school will have people and resources that can help you find work after. I don't think I've ignored parts of your posts to try and make this point.
                        Then I should do a better job of explaining why I think four year college is a waste (if you don't know what you are going to do) then.

                        It's too expensive.

                        The amount of money that it costs to put just one child through four years of college is prohibitively expensive for many families. Even if you have the funds to put your child though four years of college, having a child that isn't motivated to follow through with the training that they received in college means that you've wasted a lot of money to have a child working in Auto Zone (to recycle a previous example). If you lack the motivation to finish the last credit in high school, I certainly wouldn't try to subject you to four more years of continuing education, especially if you have no idea what it is you want to do. It will wind up costing you and your parents a large amount of money and you cannot and will not get results from college unless you are trying to succeed.

                        There is very little hand holding in college. If you want to skip all of your classes and drink all night you can. No one is going to force you to learn. However having you or your parents paying 20~30k a year to not take classes is ridiculous. I dare any of you who have been to a four year college to tell me that you never saw "that guy" (or girl) who never went to class, slept all day, went to every party, never studied, and when the time came around to take the test, he failed horribly.

                        If you go up and ask that guy why he's in college in the first place, the answer is almost always "because my parents wanted me to make something of myself", "I just wanted to have fun", or even "I don't know" those are horrible reasons to go into the amount of debt that college will incur. It would have been better to find a path in life that was acceptable to you and your life style and work towards that goal instead. Your parents may want you to go to college and take advantage of the opportunities that they might not have had a chance at, but are you living for your own expectations or are you living for other people's expectations?

                        That's why I will always stress finding out what you want to do for yourself first and foremost. It doesn't have to be college, but it may very well be college. I just seen too many people go to college and bomb out because it wasn't what they wanted to do, it was what they were expected to do.

                        For someone who is motivated to do something, but hasn't narrowed it down to one field yet, college is great. You can try out a little bit of everything while you get your basic requirements out of the way. Do the maths and sciences or reading and art appreciation courses during your first two years. Stick your nose into various fields and speak to seniors and juniors. Find out what you like best and go in that direction. That's what college is for.

                        Even someone who knows what they are going to do can find that they like something else better in college. Hey, I went to college for mathematics, but switched over to compsci... not quite as big of a leap as an english major changing to marine biology which is what one person I know did. However the fact still remained that we had a plan and a desire to follow that plan, then when we changed the plan we still had the desire to follow through with the change.

                        What I don't want is for someone who has no motivation going to a four year university because that's what others expect them to do. It's a horrible way to spend your life trying living to someone else's expectations. (they make movies for that kind of thing all of the time. )
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                        • #42
                          Re: Being a high school dropout.

                          College can be expensive but I know a number of folks that took advantage of a smaller, community college and then transferred for the last year or two into a 4 year school. That is a great way to save money instead of starting at a 4 year school. Heck, some community colleges have some great 1 or 2 year medical training classes that can get you working as soon as you finish the program. College can really open doors if a person is committed to completing the work. But my college years were a lot better than the high school years.

                          Whoever says high school is the best years of your life probably never went to college - personal opinion only!

                          As for the the note about the person that never shows up for class and bombs horribly - yes, I saw a lot of that when I was in college and that still happens today (I work at a college, and hear about the stories from some freshmen and they make it seem like it is something new - ha!). I remember some large orientation session where they told everyone to look left, right, in front and behind you, and many of the folks wouldn't be here in a year. What is also interesting is the distortion that media gives of college to a lot of teens. In 2010, one of my neighbor's daughters went to the college I work at (really was incredible since I use to babysit that person!), and she expected to party, drink, good times all the time. While some of that can be allowed in moderation, she got hit with the academic sides of things and it was like getting hit with a truck. I guess for some, various media sources lied and the incoming student is just slammed with a reality check once things get started. Regardless, the ones that don't bother with that reality check are probably the ones that never attend, fail, and just wasted a lot of money.

                          Err. Anyway.

                          For a person not sure if college is for them, I would suggest to try a community college for a semester. At least it is an inexpensive test to see if a person can be committed / capable of doing the work to complete a 2 or 4 year program. At the least, a person can look into short training programs, especially in the medical field.

                          Jim

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                          • #43
                            Re: Being a high school dropout.

                            Hey everybody. I thought I'd give a little update.
                            First of all, thanks for all your support ha. I am going back to school, but I have a little different plan of how to do it now.
                            Instead of summer school, I'm gonna go to this other school next year that works a bit different than regular high schools. Basically, you take a class for 2 hours a day instead of one and it lasts 2.5 months instead of 5. It's a quarter instead of a semester. I actually went there for a few quarters last year.
                            I'm actually aiming for something more now though. I don't just want to get my last class, but upgrade my maths as well so I can get into this one college course (I'll provide a link later in my post). My doctor is planning to prescribe pills to help me concentrate in school, so I should be able to focus better when I go back.
                            One ittle thing I'm worried about is, this school is kinda...rough. It is filled with gangsters/criminals/etc. I'm hoping if I just stay away from the people and leave them alone I'll be fine. I have gone there before after all.
                            Right now, I'm gonna save up a bunch of money and not spend it, then when I go back I'll quit work completely. I do have a huge backlog that will last me a long time. When I go to school I'll only spend it if a console breaks or something. Quitting should help me do better in school as well.
                            This is the course I am looking at:
                            http://www.siast.sk.ca/programs_cour...ions/ESE.shtml

                            I have two friends who are actually in the same course or a similar course. It is apparently one of the hardest courses you can take, but I've been feeling really confident lately, and I want to work hard, so I believe I can do this.

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                            • #44
                              Re: Being a high school dropout.

                              Good for you. Hard work always comes before any success, and I hope you do well.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Re: Being a high school dropout.

                                Originally posted by Cutliquidsnake View Post
                                I have two friends who are actually in the same course or a similar course. It is apparently one of the hardest courses you can take, but I've been feeling really confident lately, and I want to work hard, so I believe I can do this.
                                Electric Engineering is definitely a ball buster course. Just be sure to stick with it. Back when I took a microprocessor course I was only learning about circuit theory and design for 486 processors. I can only imagine what the processors that are out now require in terms of design. Make sure you have all of your calculus formulas down, especially derivatives, because you will use them. Also I suggest would brushing up a bit on Assembly Language in your free time. While C and TCL are more important than Assembly overall, I personally think it's best to at least get your feet wet with Assembly as a foundation.
                                Figure Enthusiast
                                Moderator: Comics, Movies, General Anime, Off-topic, Gaming Goodness

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